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Home » Eye Care Services » Your Eye Health

Your Eye Health

Learning about your eye health can be complicated – and might even seem overwhelming at first. To simplify things for our patients, we’ve created our Eye Health Library, a comprehensive library of vision-related information. We invite you to browse through our library to find information that will help you better understand how your vision works, common eye conditions, surgeries and how your vision changes as you age.

  • Start here for an overview of the different types of surgery to correct myopia, hyperopia and astigmatism; and the merits and drawbacks of each.
  • Early professional eye care for children is highly recommended – even before kids start school. Watch this short video to see why.
  • Read facts and watch a short video on UV rays.
  • It’s the most popular vision correction surgery, by far. Learn what to expect before, during and after the procedure.
  • An individualized program of eye exercises and other methods can treat non-refractive vision problems such as eye alignment and lazy eye.
  •    Read facts and watch a short video about glare and anti-relective lenses.
  • Complications from LASIK are few, but they do happen. It’s important to understand the risks, and how to minimize them.
  • How often should your child's eyes be examined? What's the difference between a school vision screening and a comprehensive eye exam? and more.
  • Healthy Sight isn’t a slogan; it’s a way of life that enhances your everyday vision while preserving the well being of your eyes. It means getting regular checkups.
  • Successful LASIK surgeons get that way from experience and the ability to screen out poor candidates for the procedure. Here’s the list of what makes you a good candidate.
  • Knowing the expected milestones of your baby's vision development during their first year of life can ensure your child is seeing properly and enjoying their world to the fullest.
  • Sometimes because of disease or injury, the cornea becomes so damaged that problems cannot be corrected with eyeglasses, contacts, or refractive surgery such as LASIK.
  • An alternative to LASIK, PPK is a no-flpa eye surgery. Learn about the advantages and disadvantages, as well as what to expect.
  • Contact lenses offer advantages in the areas of sports and self-esteem. But when is your child old enough for contacts?
  • A number of relatively new procedures are addressing the age-related decrease in ability to focus on near objects, that was once correctable only with bifocals.
  • Seeing clearly is just one part of your overall eye health. It’s important to have regular eye exams whether or not you wear glasses or contacts, and even if your vision is sharp. The articles below explain what problems can be spotted with an eye exam, what’s involved in a comprehensive exam, and special considerations for kids and contacts.
  • These small lenses or optical devices are inserted into the cornea to alter its shape and correct vision problems.
  • Certain types of contact lenses and eyeglasses may play a role in slowing the progression of myopia, or nearsightedness.
  • Read more about some of the most common eye diseases including cataracts, diabetes, glaucoma and macular degeneration.
  • Eye problems can range from mild to severe; some are chronic, while others may resolve on their own, never to appear again. The articles below will give you a basic understanding of some of these problems and their implications. The cardinal rule is if your eyes don't look good, feel good or see well, you should visit your doctor.
  • If you are among the 85 million Baby Boomers in the United States and Canada (born between 1946 and 1964), you've probably noticed your eyes have changed. Most notably, presbyopia - the normal, age-related loss of near focusing ability - usually becomes a problem in our 40's, requiring new vision correction solutions. Learn about measures you can take to keep seeing clearly for years to come.
  • Just as our physical strength decreases with age, our eyes also exhibit an age-related decline in performance - particularly as we reach our 60's and beyond. Some age-related eye changes are perfectly normal, but others may signal a disease process. It's important to recognize signs and symptoms, and perhaps even more important to mitigate the effects of aging with some simple and common-sense strategies.
  • Computer vision syndrome (CVS) and blue light exposure are becoming increasingly serious threats to our vision, health and productivity.